What does a mum with PND look like? - Happity Blog
Maternal Mental Health

What does a mum with PND look like?

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What does a mum with PND look like? It might not be the one you expect. She might be the mum you meet at a toddler group who looked like she’s got it all together. Or the mum you passed on the street who smiled and looked so happy.

The truth is you might never know how another mum is REALLY feeling. So be kind! Always.

1. The mother with the biggest smile in the room

When you think of someone who has depression you expect them to look sad or down. But a mum with PND might have the brightest smile in the room. Why? Because she might be putting on a mask. And making a really big effort to hide her true feelings.

2. The one who looks like they’ve got it all together

A mum with PND might look like someone who has got the hang of this parenting gig and appears to do it with ease. She might post photos to social media where she and her baby look so happy and content. You might even see those pics and feel a little envious of how easily she seems to have slotted into her new role as a mama.

Remember that social media never tells the whole story. The mum you think is bossing it might really be struggling behind closed doors. She might also be doing both!

busting the myths of postnatal depression

3. The one who is chatty and engaged when you meet them

You might expect a mum with PND is withdrawn and disengaged. But she might be friendly and chatty when you meet her. The truth is it might have taken a lot of strength and energy for her to get out and be with others. And she might be putting in her all to chat and engage to find support but to also hide her PND – especially with those she’s just met.

4. The one who looks amazing

You met a mum who looked amazing. Dressed immaculately, her smile enhanced by a slick of lippy. Hair looking fab. You cannot always tell who has depression by her outward appearance. She might have put her best look on to raise her confidence before leaving the house.

6. The mum who is surrounded by family and friends

You might know or meet a mum who has family nearby who are super supportive and who has loads of amazing friends. And think that they must be so happy and well.

It can certainly help, but even being surrounded by an army of caring people that love you is sometimes no shield for PND.

Those suffering might be surrounded by a load of people who care but still feel isolated and alone.

7. The mother you LEAST expect to have PND

The truth is that you might not know who is struggling with their mental health. Unless they tell you.

Sometimes those suffering choose not to tell many people about their struggles.

PND – behind the mask

There is still too much stigma and too many myths surrounding PND. Many mums might feel a misplaced feeling of shame or a fear of judgement if they admit they are suffering.

They might feel alone and lonely.

They might not know how to ask for help. Or just not have the energy to reach out.

Support for PND

Sometimes the hardest and bravest step when you have PND is asking for help. When you take that step you are one step closer to recovery. And PND is 100% recoverable.

Find out where to get help and support

We always recommend Pandas as a wonderful place to get support. And APNI.

We also have some amazing classes listed on Happity that support mums with PND. Head to Happity to find classes near you.

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