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It feels incredibly daunting to figure out how to improve your mood when you are stuck in a rut. Life is chaotic as a parent, and finding time to think about how to improve an unhappy mindset is more complicated than it sounds. Is there an easy way to approach our mental health?

Lisa Thompson, Happity’s Customer Support Manager and mum to a feisty three-year-old boy, recently did a Happity Lunchtime Live. She gave some fabulous tips on how to bring a bit more warmth into our lives and improve our mood following the guidance of a simple acronym.

Read on to find out more!


Using F.L.A.M.E to add warmth into your day!

As may have been the case with many of you reading this, my son’s birth did not go to plan and in the months after he came along. I had anxiety, PTSD and was physically poorly as well.

I decided to make little changes every day to get back to good. So that I could be the best mum that I can be.

So I have thought about the things that work best for me and wanted to share them with you today. I have even put together a little acronym.

This is what works for me, it may or may not work for you. Some of it you may have heard before but hopefully, there will be some new things for you to try.

As a mum, most of my examples will be about being a mum but these tips are for everyone! So if you are a dad, grandparent, carer or anyone really, then please do listen and join in too!

The acronym I use is this:

F.L.A.M.E

It’s a bit cheesy but I have chosen FLAME as this is about igniting your spirit and gaining more energy.

And don’t worry, the E is not for exercise! The last thing you need if you have been up all night with a teething baby is for me to tell you to go for a walk!

F: Thoughtful food to improve your mood

Now, rather predictably the F does stand for Food, but most importantly for fruit & veg! This is not about weight loss, this is about giving your body what it needs to thrive.

It’s recommended that we have between 7 and 10 80g servings. However many of us don’t get anywhere near that. It can be too much to try and get there all at once.

So, think about where you are at the moment; if it is only one a day, then that is your baseline.

Try and build up slowly to five servings a day, starting with fruit which in my opinion is a lot more fun than veg!

To get started pick your favourite fruit and then have that as a snack once a day. Or have it with your breakfast. Then when that habit has stuck, build in another fruit. Once you have built in the fruit, then you can start to build in the veg. Add cucumber or tomatoes to sandwiches, have good quality soups and try to have one serving of veg with your dinner. You’ll be at your 5 a day in no time and will probably be feeling awesome!

Introducing fruit and vegetables into your diet can really help to improve your mood

One thing I noticed I was doing was giving my son lots of fruit but never eating it myself! So now when I give it to him, I have some myself too!

I go along to the shops with my son and we pick a new fruit or vegetable together and take it home and eat it. It’s a great way to eat more fruit and veg and it is an activity for you to do together as well!

Check out this article the NHS has made, “8 tips for healthy eating“.

L: Laughter & fun!

Whether you are in the first 12 weeks or 12 years of parenthood, there are days that can just feel like a slog. You just have to get through them. However, my tip to improve your mood is to make time for fun every day and seek out opportunities for laughter.

Laughter helps to reduce your heart rate, lowers levels of stress hormones in your body and also connects us.

Take time each day to seek out something fun. Read a funny book, listen to shows on the radio which make you laugh, at the end of the day watch a comedy, rather than a gloomy drama. Contact someone who always makes you laugh.

These little moments in the day pierce the bubble of that feeling of slog.

Two friends together laughing over coffee

Another great way that still helps improve my mood is going to classes! Taking my son along to a music class, singing songs, shaking instruments, trying and failing to keep up with the signing of songs all made me feel great. My son loved them, and It also really improved my mood when the other parents were having a giggle as well.

So if you have not booked a class yet, I would really recommend going along to one and of course, there are lots of amazing providers on Happity! Check them out here!

A: Ask for help to improve your mood

Being a parent does not come with a manual and a lot of what happens is completely unexpected but many parents don’t ask for help for fear of judgement.

I really struggled with breastfeeding for about 8-weeks. And, as a lot of us do, I kept it in and I didn’t tell anybody. I kept it in, and I kept it in, and I kept it in. And as repressed feelings often do, it all came bursting out of me.

I was in a bit of a state. But I started to talk about it. I asked for help, I started to share my experience, I expressed my feelings, and it was almost like a cloud lifted.

Nobody judged me. Nobody called me a terrible mother as I had feared. Everyone was so kind and so helpful, and I managed to sort myself out. Eventually, I moved on.

Maybe that’s an extreme example, but it still applies to general problems that play on your mind. If you’re tired, or overwhelmed, or are not sure what you are doing then reach out to a person you trust. Whether that’s your partner, your GP, a friend -I promise you, it will help.

Seeking out help from a friend or professional can really help to improve your mood

Again, go along to classes, speak to the other parents and you will see that we are all in this together and not alone. But, if you are really struggling to cope, contact your GP. Or take a look at our PND support page to find out more information about who could help if you are unsure.

M: Moment of calm

I don’t about you but my mornings start in a really hectic way. Sometimes by a three-year-old shouting cock-a-doodle-doo at the top of his voice.

Then it’s breakfast, getting dressed, teeth cleaning, getting out of the house and getting him to the nursery or to my Mum’s. Then once he’s there my mind turns to what I have to do that day and starts whirring at the speed of light.

This is a pretty stressful way to start the day. So once my son is safe where he needs to be, I take a few minutes just to calm it down before plunging into the next part of my day.

Writing in a journal can really help to improve your mood!

It could be breathing exercises for a few minutes, meditation, journaling. Or maybe having a mindful walk on the way home from nursery. Whatever it is, it provides a pause and a moment of rest before you get going again. Sometimes it is just a case of having a cup of tea in the garden to improve your mood.

It might seem counterproductive when you have so much to do. But just taking a few minutes to rebalance will leave you more focused, calm and less stressed.

E: Enjoy improving your mood!

There are two parts to this one.

The first one is to do something that you enjoy every day or at least every week. If this sounds unrealistic for you, then just start small with five minutes or small acts. The key here is to do something that is just for you and is not part of being a parent so that you can start to feel like yourself again! 

  • Read a book that you have wanted to start for ages.
  • Listen to your favourite songs
  • Restart a long-forgotten hobby/start a new one.
  • Have a bath
  • Put on your favourite perfume/cologne
  • Craft
  • Go to the gym

If it’s available to you, then ask your partner or a trusted person to look after your little one(s) regularly.

Another good way to build this in is to practice ‘bundling’. Which is where you pair an everyday task with something fun. If I’m tidying up all the toys at the end of the day then I will listen to my favourite songs or podcast. It really helps to make it more enjoyable.

These little interventions can turn a bad day into a good one in an instant and start to make each day better.

Young woman painting in her art studio to improve her mood

The second half is to enjoy the small things! When we are deep in the busyness of every day, it is hard to remember to enjoy what’s happening.

A friend of mine starts every meeting that she runs with everyone thinking about what their ‘best thing today’ was. This is something that my husband and I do every night before we go to bed. It can be something really small. But taking time to think about what it might be that changes your mindset and you start to actively notice the good in every day.


So that’s all of Lisa’s tips on how to improve your mood!

Thank you so much Lisa for some absolutely brilliant advice!

Hopefully, we’ll be seeing Lisa at a Happity lunchtime live again in the future!

If you enjoyed reading this blog, maybe you would also like:

9 Approachable ways to Deal With Post Lockdown Anxiety

Easy Weight Loss Tips for Busy Mums

15 Unexpected Facts You May Learn as a New Dad

Is loneliness a new epidemic amongst new mums? It’s a paradox because as a new mum you’re never alone (with your new baby with you every day and night) but you can also feel so very lonely.

A recent study by the Red Cross found that more than 8 in 10 mums feel lonely some of the time. Another survey by Channel Mum revealed that more than 90% of mums in the UK admit to feeling lonely since having children. A statistic that is shocking, but perhaps not surprising.

Loneliness as a new mum is something we don’t talk about enough. 3 in 5 new mums surveyed said they tried to hide their feelings and 38% have never told their partner.

In the past 18 months, as we’ve all gone through lockdowns, this epidemic of loneliness amongst new parents has surely got worse.

Nicola from Team Happity opens up about how much loneliness affected her after having her first baby. We hand over to her to tell her story:


How loneliness as a new mum took me by surprise

I’d done everything I thought possible to prepare for having a baby. I’d bought all the kit, read all the books, been to all the antenatal classes. But one thing I hadn’t prepared for was loneliness.

Loneliness as a new mum was something I’d never expected and something I hadn’t prepared for. And it hit me like a ton of bricks.

I hadn’t ever felt lonely before: through school, through university and at work.

I was the first of my friends to have a baby. All my friends were busy with work and with their own lives. Suddenly I found myself alone all day, every day with just my baby for company.

I felt lonelier than ever before. And it had a huge effect on my mental health and my confidence.

Where do all the other mums go?

I found myself with every day yawning ahead of me with nowhere to go. I walked with my baby in her sling or her pram finding myself in an unchartered daytime world. I passed pensioners, hurried people on their way to goodness knows where.

I also passed other new mums pushing their prams with more purpose than me. Where were they going? How did they know where to go?

I smiled at every other mum I passed trying to put out ‘Please be friends with me’ vibes!

lonely mum staring out of the window

Accosting the postie!

As the weeks went by I found myself craving adult company. Here I was, day after day, feeding, rocking and soothing, and talking to my baby (who at this age gave very little chat back!).

I used to head out to the corner shop and talk to the till assistant for longer than was socially acceptable. And when the postman rang the bell to deliver a parcel I would strike up a conversation and keep him on the doorstep. I was just so desperate to speak to another adult human being!

Plucking up the nerves to get out there and confront loneliness as a new mum

I eventually found out details of baby classes and baby and toddler groups near me and plucked up the courage to go along to one or two each week. After weeks of being at home alone with my baby, suddenly getting back out there was daunting.

I used to have to steel myself to go. And often had to pause at the entrance to try and settle my nerves before walking into a room full of other parents. Would they all be friends and would I be left out? Would my baby be the only one that cried and then would everybody judge me?

Slowly finding my tribe

group of mums at a baby class

I didn’t make friends instantly. Often I’d feel shy and awkward in groups and leave feeling a little lonelier than before.

Things changed when I found a lovely baby music group that was warm and welcoming. There was time at the end of each class to have a cuppa and chat.

Having babies is a great leveller. I think we were all feeling lonely to some degree and we all wanted to share our stories with other parents who might ‘get it’.

I soon found that over cups of tea we were sharing birth stories and breastfeeding struggles; tales of sleep deprivation and new mum worries. Over time we opened up more and more. Feeling OK to admit we were having a tough day or that we’d had a cry just before class after an exhausting morning where the baby just wouldn’t stop crying.

I began to look forward to Wednesdays as ‘baby music days’. And over time, as we swapped numbers, the other days of the week were filled with coffee dates and walks in the park.


Nicola spoke about loneliness as a new mum over on Instagram. You can watch the Instagram video here.

Loneliness: How the pandemic affected new parents

While loneliness is something many new mums feel, things got tougher still for new parents during the pandemic. Lockdown forced new parents to tackle the challenges of bringing up a baby without the usual support network of classes, family and friends to help them.

Talking to the BBC, one mum, Zunaira from Peterborough, describes how it felt:

“It’s lonely. You lose your own self, you forget about yourself – and all the focus is on another person. Your identity goes and I fel like I was suffocating. You just want to sit in a cafe, have a bit of cake and a talk.”

Talking to The Metro, Theresa Raymond, who gave birth to her daughter just before lockdown, said:

“Not being able to let my family see my baby or have face-to-face follow-up midwife appointments have been the hardest things to adapt to. 

Especially as a first-time mum, I had this image of how it was meant to be which has been scuppered a little.”

Thank goodness that classes and groups are now back.

Find a baby class: meet others who are tackling loneliness as a new mum

Happity was set up by Sara Tateno after she herself felt lonely as a new mum. Emily Tredget, our co-founder, experienced severe PND and anxiety after having her son and one of the things that helped her recovery was getting out of the house and going to groups and classes to meet other parents.

One of our missions at Happity is to combat loneliness for new parents by connecting them though baby and toddler classes.

If you’re feeling lonely – do go along to a class or group. We know it can be daunting. But it’s definitely worth it.

Find a baby or toddler class near you here.

You might also like:

6 reasons why mums friends are so brilliant

Why baby and toddler classes are so important

9 brilliant benefits of baby and toddler classes

From nappies to changing mats, breast pumps to baby burps, there’s a lot to get to grips with as a new dad. There are so many books, online articles and antenatal classes that will help you prepare before you bring your new baby home.

However, no matter how much information you gather beforehand, there are a lot of things that might take you by surprise once your new baby arrives. But, don’t fret! You’re not alone in the way you’re feeling.

Here are some thoughts, feelings and facts we found that dads may experience when they first become parents.

1. The world suddenly seems fraught with danger!

From being concerned about whether your newborn will start choking on a toy, to panicking when your little one has their first hiccups: it’s easy to feel overly worried about the safety and wellbeing of your baby! But, it’s okay. That’s very common for a lot of new parents.

Remember: don’t ever feel silly for being worried about your baby’s safety. Newborns seem so tiny and vulnerable.

The key is to follow your gut. If something really doesn’t feel right, contact your health visitor, midwife or GP to check. Or, if you’re not 100% sure whether it’s cause for concern, contact 111 (the non-emergency NHS number that will help give you information when needed).

2. Fun fact: as a new dad, you forget what sleep is

This might be a typical trope that you see in every TV show and every film, but it doesn’t make it any less true! In the early days of parenthood, it’s very likely that you catch a lot less of your Z’s at night.

Grab any rest you can and know that it DOES get easier (honest!)

3. It isn’t just your partner who is up late feeding the baby

It’s a turn-based system for a lot of folks. If your partner is breastfeeding then perhaps you can help by changing your baby’s nappy after a feed and settling them back to sleep. If you’re bottle-feeding it’s easier to take turns and divvy up the night shift.

Sharing the responsibility can help the feeling of being a unit with your partner while also helping to experience that quality bonding time with your baby.

4. New dads, New friends

There’s a lot of talk about the importance of mum friends and how great they can be in the duration of early parenthood.

However, there’s a certain group that are just as important: dad friends!

Finding your tribe is just as important for dads as it is for mums. Shout out to the dads who make us laugh when everything feels like it’s on fire, or who don’t judge us when we are truly struggling. You guys are the best!

Two dad friends laughing together

(Read our blog on why mum (and dad) friends are so brilliant!)

5. Expect the unexpected

Despite any preparations you make in advance; no matter how many stories you hear from other dads, the unexpected will likely happen!

This will be new and unfamiliar territory, so don’t panic if something occurs that wasn’t in the books!

Just take a deep breath, relax, and follow your gut.

6. Your home will be invaded by the baby-pocalypse!

Before you had a baby, you probably didn’t realise that diaper decor was a thing, did you?

Well with the new abundance of toys scattered across the floor, baby gates in every doorway, and a spattering of new stains and smells around the house, you’re bound to know exactly what it is now!

The arrival of a baby truly does change the dynamic of a home as much as it does a family. But, if that thought worries you, don’t worry! The home you loved and decorated before is still there. It’s just a little bit buried at the moment. If you feel like you and your partner need an escape from the baby-pocalypse, perhaps it would be good to keep a room in your house that is baby-free.

Get out your “No baby toys or nappies allowed past this point!” sign and nail it firmly to the door. You and your partner need your own space. Don’t be afraid to keep hold of it.

7. If you are a new dad, you can experience PND

A lot of people may think that PND is something that can primarily affect women following the birth of their babies. However, it’s definitely something that can affect men too!

According to PANDA’s, 1 in 20 men experience depression during their partner’s pregnancy, and up to 1 in 10 men struggle with PND following the birth of their baby. That figure is a shocking one, that possibly a lot of men don’t know about. So remember, try to take care of yourself. If you notice that you are feeling uncharacteristically low or irritable, perhaps it’s time to reach out for help?

If you feel that you yourself may be struggling or dealing with PND, reach out to your local GP or contact charities like PANDAS. (Find out more at our support page here)

A new dad kissing their newborn baby

8. You will start thinking about your own mortality more and more

Up until this point, we all feel like we’re pretty invincible. You don’t often think about the dangerous side of your actions or the potential risks that may occur. But now that you have a tiny human in your care, it’s very likely that you’ll start to consider these things more and more.

It’s a good thing to consider the activities in your life that do cause risk to your being. However, it should be said that you should avoid giving up any hobbies that make you the person you are. You have a baby in your care, and they will shape the person you are a lot more. But don’t throw away all the other things you love.

9. New dad: it’s okay to feel blue sometimes – even if you don’t know why

When your partner has a lot on her plate, or the people around you seem chaotically stressed out, you sometimes push your own feelings down and put them as a “low priority”. You will continue to take on more responsibilities and might pretend that everything is fine.

But, everyone feels a little blue sometimes. Including you! You may not even truly understand why it is you feel blue or run-down. But if at all possible, you should try and be open about the way you’re feeling with others. Maybe talking about it out loud will help you identify the problem?

10. It’s okay to accept help from others

It can be difficult to accept help sometimes. We all want to feel like we can do it ourselves. But, when it comes to having a new baby in the house, there’s just so much that needs to be done!

If someone offers to watch the baby for a day while you do some self-maintenance, or perhaps sends you a meal they’ve prepared or other supplies – take it! People are more than happy to help, and it will possibly feel refreshing to have an extra pair of hands nearby.

11. Regardless of how stressful and tired you both may be, you and your partner still support and care for one another

Who was it that said having a baby is like chucking a grenade into a marriage? The beginning period of parenthood can be a busy and tiring time. Both you and your partner may be stressed beyond any limit that you thought either of you could reach before.

However, despite any standoffish or stressful situations that the two of you may encounter, you both are in this together! You are a team, and remember that you both still love and care for one another. The two of you just produced a tiny little human together! You’re both miracle workers, and should reassure each other of that if and when you can.

A new dad and new mum embracing their newborn baby

12. New Dad: you need a support system too

A lot of women are told to keep a support system in place during parenthood. This might be a friendship group, or a “tribe” that they have met at baby or toddler group.

However, you need that too! Perhaps it’s time that you go out and try to find your tribe! Why not take your little one to a baby class? Don’t worry, regardless of how they may market towards women, they are all more than welcoming towards dads too!

Find a baby group to join today!

13. Finances could be on your mind a lot more now

This one is probably one you started to realise during the pregnancy period, but babies are expensive! Suddenly you’re picking up the cheaper brand in the supermarket, and deciding whether or not to cancel that Netflix subscription.

Whilst it’s a very good idea to try and find some new money-saving hacks, you definitely shouldn’t stop putting money into things that make you happy or help you relax.

There’s a lot of good places you can find money-saving advice, watching programmes by financial journalists like Martin Lewis, or even booking an appointment with a financial consultant if you really need it. There are answers and advice out there – try not to let it occupy your mind too much!

14. Don’t feel bad for needing time away from your baby as a new dad

It’s only human to need some space every once in a while. With the arrival of a new baby, it sometimes might simultaneously feel like you’re never alone but also, surprisingly, isolated. We need other adults in our life.

Don’t feel bad though. It’s incredibly likely that your partner feels the same way themselves! Maybe try deciding a few times and days where you can take it in turns to look after your baby while the other goes to see some other adults. It’s easy to feel guilty, but sometimes we need some time away from our little ones to be the best parents we can be.

15. You didn’t realise how much you could love another human until you had a baby

During the prenatal period, it’s very easy to get swept up in the rush and the frantic chaos of pregnancy. You have got used to “The Bump”. And, perhaps, you haven’t yet been able to fully recognise “The Bump” as another human yet.

But, there’s a special moment that a lot of parents experience once the baby has arrived. You see their face, their very little body that you feel like you have to be extra careful approaching. You hold your hand out towards them, and then their tiny little hand takes hold of what seems like a titanic finger in comparison. Their hand grips onto it so tightly that it catches your breath.

It’s in that moment that you realise that in front of you is possibly the most perfect little human that you’ve ever seen. And you never want them to let go.

A baby's hand is gripping hold of a new dad's forefinger.

Well, these are the new dad facts, thoughts and feelings that we found out about! Did you relate to any of them?

What have we missed in our list? What unexpected thoughts and feelings did you go through when you first became a new dad?

If you liked this post, you might also like:

Mum friends (And 6 reasons why they’re so brilliant!)

Be More Toddler! How it could make us happier

9 Brilliant Benefits of Baby and Toddler Classes

Baby and toddler groups are back on. But what a rollercoaster it’s been during the last 18 months or so. Both for class providers and for new parents.

This week a new report from the House of Commons Petition Committee has been published. Amongst other things, it looks back on the issues raised when guidelines were not clear for baby and toddler groups. As well as every time lockdown restrictions were lifted, and furthermore the lessons we must learn going forward. But the report covers so many more aspects of the impact on parents including ‘mental health services’, ‘workplace discrimination & redundancy’ and ‘recovery funding and the “baby blind spot”’ (just to list a few!).

The new HoC report looking back on this journey

A new report has just been published (in October 2021).

This was following the House of Commons Petitions Committee hearing evidence from panellists about the issues faced by both parents and baby and toddler group providers during the pandemic. It outlines the confusion about support groups being listed as exempt from restrictions:

“Since last autumn, Government guidance has allowed up to 30 people to meet as a “support group” (specifically including parent and baby groups), in an exemption from restrictions on gatherings. Witnesses suggested that while this exemption had been “really helpful” in giving some groups the confidence to restart, many others had not done so, depriving parents of what Dr McMullen described as “a vital safety net”.

HoC Petitions Committee

5 babies laying on  Matt in a circle after the pandemic, during a baby and/or toddler group

Emily suggested parent and baby group organisers were wary of restarting classes following negative experiences last winter. Even with such groups having been exempted from restrictions on gatherings and now the removal of legal restrictions. She told the committee:

We did a survey and it said that 24% [of providers] are still very confused as to whether they can go back. Some of them are quite traumatised from their experience back in November. We were telling them that they were allowed, the DfE was telling them that they were allowed. But still, their councils were coming in, forcibly in some cases, with police, shutting them down […] We definitely need to look at what we do going forward, in case there are any further issues.

-Emily Tredget

How the closure of groups affected parents

The impact of not being able to run classes on providers is clear. But the lack of face to face classes and the support they provide had a massive impact on parents too. The report found that:

Witnesses were also concerned the pandemic may have a long-term scarring effect on the provision of community-led support groups and parent and baby groups. Emily Tredget suggested parent and baby group providers had seen an average drop of 63% in their revenues over the last 12 months. While Dr McMullen cited figures from the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO) suggesting many charities organising such groups had also seen financial losses. We heard that families in more deprived areas may be particularly affected by the loss of such services.

-HoC Petitions Committee

Mother at a Mum/Baby & toddler yoga group, with her baby in a sling

The road ahead for baby and toddler groups after the pandemic

We’re at the stage where many (almost the majority) of legal restrictions that were put in place before have been lifted. And that means so many more baby and toddler classes are back and running in person again. Which is just fantastic!

Class providers carry out their own risk assessments to make sure classes are safe and secure. And, as always, are welcoming and fun for parents and their little ones.

We all hope that we’ve seen the last of lockdowns (please!). But there are important things to learn if we do face them again. The report summarises:

Our inquiry last year heard compelling evidence on the crucial role of community support and parent and baby groups in supporting new parents’ wellbeing. The Government’s recognition of this in exempting such groups from some gathering restrictions last year was very welcome. However, the Government must now do more to clarify how organisers of these groups and classes can offer these services in a safe and responsible way following the lifting of most legal restrictions. The Government should produce clear and dedicated guidance for organisers of community and charity-run support groups (including parent and baby groups) on how they can safely restart and continue classes in a covid-safe way. It should work with group organisers, local authorities and other relevant sector stakeholders to develop this guidance and ensure it is widely communicated. 

-HoC Petitions Committee

Have you been back to baby and toddler groups after the pandemic?

Have you been to a baby or toddler class since restrictions were lifted? We know (from following so many class providers on social media) just how delighted they are to be back. And they’ve been sharing lovely feedback from the parents who are loving being back in class too.

Search Happity today to find baby or toddler classes near you.

Feeling a bit nervous about going back? You don’t need to be:

Toddlers are brilliant little people. They live in the moment and have NO filter – always telling it like it is. And we think they can teach us a thing or two about how to live. We should all be a bit more toddler – here’s why!

You think you’re amazing 100% of the time

Toddlers have a total belief in themselves. They know how amazing they are and that self confidence and belief shines out of them. Self love is a brilliant thing. And if you can recognise your strengths it can take you a long way. Of course life has a way of knocking us down and making us doubt ourselves – especially once we become parents. But – you’re amazing! Know it, believe it and own it!

If you don’t want to do it – say ‘No’

cute toddler

My niece who is an adorable threenager has a phrase which she pulls out every time she doesn’t want to do something: ‘Don’t want it, don’t like it, not playing!’

What a brilliant attitude!

Of course – sometimes – she has to do it anyway (and let’s face it lots of her resistance is about things like brushing her teeth and taking baths – which she just has to go with!)

But this toddler approach is something we should all keep in mind. How many times have you agreed to do something just because you were too scared to say ‘No’?

Saying ‘No’ more often can be a good thing. It can take off the pressure of doing too much. And relieve anxiety.

So – be more toddler – and, if you don’t want to do it – say ‘No’

If you fall down, get back up again

When toddlers stumble they might cry but – after a quick cuddle – they immediately get back up and try again. And it’s a life lesson we can all learn. Don’t fear failure. We all mess up. When you do, dust yourself down and get right back up again.

Be more toddler and live for the moment

be more toddler

Toddlers live in the now. They don’t look back or worry about tomorrow. It’s all about the present.

In short, they’ve mastered mindfulness!

And that’s something that can benefit you. Live in the moment. Take in the sights and sounds around you right NOW! Be present and be mindful.

Be more toddler and dance like no one else is watching

When a toddler hears music (and even when they don’t) they break out all their best moves with no inhibitions! We say – take a leaf from their books – and dance like nobody’s watching. Wherever and whenever! Find those joyful moments in your day and boogie!

Every day is a new day full of promise

Toddlers wake up (too early, admittedly!) and embrace the day. They bounce with joy ready to face a whole new adventure.

It’s a brilliant approach.

And something we could all learn from our positive thinking little humans!

Always stop to notice the little things

toddler holding flower

Toddlers can be entranced by the smallest things. The littlest magical moments in their day. They look down and look up and notice the clouds and the insects crawling along a wall. They really stop and notice the magical moments in their day.

If we can take a leaf from their books and stop to notice the little things too, we can share their wonder of the world and feel happier.

Be more toddler and never stop learning

Toddlers learn something new every day. And relish it.

We should all never stop learning and discovering and challenging ourselves. It’s exciting and inspiring.

Whether it’s learning a new recipe to cook, starting a new class to learn a new hobby or visiting a new place – keeping on learning makes life richer.

Clap yourself – and expect others to clap too

Toddlers don’t hold back when it comes to celebrating their wins. And we should do the same. The little wins (like getting through one of THOSE days!) and the big wins.

We should celebrate our strengths.

And make sure we tell other mums how great they are too!

The toddler years

We can all agree that toddlers can teach us a lot about how to approach life. But because they feel things so much they can also struggle to regulate their emotions. Tantrums are part and parcel of the toddler years. Here are some top tips to help little people handle their BIG emotions

Cherish the magic moments with toddlers – like this one! It is bound to make you smile – check it out now

If you’re looking for fab classes where you and your toddler can have heaps of fun check Happity for those near you

We are all breathing that gentle sigh of relief when we see the daily coronavirus figures decline. The starting glimpses of returning to some form of normality is a HUGE reassurance. But, for a lot of us, even though “freedom day” has come and gone, we’re still feeling on-edge. A lot of us are struggling with post-lockdown anxiety, and are struggling to relax or believe that it is truly safe to go anywhere.

Things are uncertain. However, closing off from the outside world isn’t the answer. It will actually make you more anxious if you keep yourself in a lockdown.

But, if you’re looking for a few ways to start dealing with your post-lockdown anxiety, where do you begin?

Here are some approachable ways that might start to ease your post-lockdown anxiety. Hope they help!

1. Start introducing a regular daily routine (that includes leaving the house)

It was a very different lifestyle for us when the UK was living in lockdown. Yet, as much as there was fear about the figures we were hearing daily on the news, we also had a small sense of security that we could keep it out as long as we remained indoors.

With restrictions lifting, and more people going outside again, that sense of security is slipping away. So, really, it makes sense as to why we would feel frightened of the change. However, a good way of trying to ease that post-lockdown anxiety includes adding routine to our day and trying to leave the house at least once a day. Even if you leave the house, take your little one for a walk around the block, and then go home again. You’ll feel better for the fresh air, and you will give yourself a gradual reassurance that letting the outside world into your home is not necessarily a bad thing.

2. Mindfulness/meditation/breathing exercises

When we’re feeling tense and anxious, it can be quite difficult to come down from that heightened emotion. We can sometimes find ourselves in a downwards spiral if we continue to dwell in our thoughts. However, a good method of climbing back out again is by practicing mindfulness, meditation and/or breathing exercises.

The NHS have a page on mindfulness, and stated the following about how mindfulness can help our mental wellbeing:

Becoming more aware of the present moment can help us enjoy the world around us more and understand ourselves better.
When we become more aware of the present moment, we begin to experience afresh things that we have been taking for granted.

It’s a great idea to start taking conscious efforts to practice any of the three above ideas. Even if you aren’t feeling particularly anxious! It may not fully work straight away, but with practice, you will really feel the benefits of taking 5 or 10 minutes out of your day to focus on your mental health.

Meditation with a mother and daughter  sitting on a sofa.

If you’re interested in more ways to explore mindfulness, check out our previous blog “mindfulness for mums“.

3. Don’t beat yourself up for feeling post-lockdown anxiety

It’s very easy to feel ashamed or embarrassed for feeling anxious post-lockdown, especially if you are seeing and hearing about other people going out and “getting back to normal” again. However, the downfall for most of us when it comes to how we feel about ourselves is the way we compare ourselves with others. It’s very easy to see that others are coping just fine and to be angry or upset with ourselves for not being the same.

But, the more you beat yourself, the more upset and anxious you are going to feel. And then, you will find yourself caught in an endless loop. So, here’s the reminder you need to read (and try to say out loud to yourself) when you feel upset with yourself for feeling anxious:

You are your own person. You have your own feelings, your own thoughts and your own worries. What others can cope with right now may not be the same as what you can cope with. But there are many things that you are able to cope with, and you should hold your chin high for that. Be proud of being honest, considerate, and wonderful you.

4. Remind yourself, and establish, the areas in your life where you have control

There has been a lot of negative changes following the coronavirus outbreak. Major life-affecting changes that haven’t fully left us. It constantly feels like another lockdown is looming around the corner. The world hasn’t gone back to “normal” yet, and it’s possible that we will never return to the way things were!

…Those thoughts have probably crossed your mind a few times by now, haven’t they? The problem with these worrisome thoughts is that they are issues that are out of our control. It’s sort of similar to when parents may feel anxiety while their children are growing up and start behaving unpredictably/making their own decisions. When there are areas in our life that are out of our control, things can feel terrifying!

Feeling a lack of control can make us feel quite helpless. So one of the ways we can try to ease this element of anxiety is to remind ourselves of all the aspects in our lives we do have control over. Write down the elements in your life that you are in charge of. Make a note and think of the things that can change and improve because of your actions. This could include: physical health, your routine, designated playtime with your children, time with your partner, “me” time, who you associate with, learning/improving a new skill, the way you eat, the way you sleep or, plain and simply, the way you appreciate others and the way you think about yourself.

Remind yourself that these things are down to you! And then consciously make an effort to establish them in your life again. You are still in control of these things in your life, and try not to forget them.

5. Limit (and monitor) the amount of news and social media posts you read

We all remember that moment when we were all sat at home with our families. Hearing the PM instruct us that we must remain indoors… It was a crazy and confusing time (it still is!). And, as a result of that, we were all glued to our TV’s and our phones, waiting with bated breath to find out the next update.

We all clocked in more screen time, obsessed with finding out daily figures and hearing any fresh news on the subject. But despite the fact that we aren’t in lockdown, that problem hasn’t gone away. A lot of us still monitor our local figures on a near day-to-day basis. But, doing so is just making us more frightened anytime today’s figures are a few higher than yesterday.

So perhaps it is time for us to consciously limit the amount of this sort of media we are consuming. By limiting the amount that we are reading about this matter, the less that the pandemic may be on our minds. You do not need to block out the information completely, but reducing the amount you are consuming will do wonders!

A faceless figure holds a cup of coffee as she reads the news by social media, something that doing too much of can lead to post-lockdown anxiety

6. Set boundaries, but don’t avoid the world!

No one knows your comfort zones better than you do. It’s easy enough to stick inside them, but if “staying in your comfort zone” means never walking out of your front door, then you may have a problem!

We’re not advising that you dive head-first into a football-stadium-sized crowd, maskless and sharing drinks with friendly, but loudly howling, strangers. Keep your boundaries! If it makes you feel more comfortable, continue to stay away from crowded locations and request eating in outdoor seating areas. Wear your facemask and sanitise your hands after walking out of every shop you’ve been in.

Do what makes you feel protected- but don’t shut the world out.

7. Tell class providers about your post-lockdown anxiety

With the lift of the mandatory mask-wearing rule, a lot of people have put off attending events or going to public places. It may have put you off attending a baby or toddler class that you regularly go to. However, this is something that can probably be approached by simply reaching out and talking to your class provider.

Ask questions such as “how do you run your risk assessments” or “what are you doing to stay covid-safe”. Tell them that you feel a little bit anxious. They will be able to discuss with you what precautions you can both put in place to make you feel as comfortable as they can. Perhaps request to sit near a window or bring in your own mat to sit on.

Reach out to your favourite class providers on Happity, and see what they will do to help you with this!

8. Small, slow and steady changes

No one said that everything has to change all at once! Yes, that did happen way back when we were first being shut into our houses. But that doesn’t mean that you have to change back just as quickly.

You need to follow your own pace. If something feels like too fast of a change for you, then that’s okay! Move to the beat of your own drum. And if the rhythm you play is a little bit slower than others, don’t fret about it. Make the right changes as slow or as fast as you want.

You just need to listen to your instincts and approach new situations when you are ready for them.

9. Seek support for post-lockdown anxiety

If you are looking for more tips on how you can start to deal with your post-lockdown anxiety, then the NHS have provided their own list of tips. There’s some great advice on there that you should check out!

However, if you are finding yourself particularly struggling, then we strongly recommend reaching out to your GP or contacting a charity to talk to someone. Find more information here.

Remember, we’re still in uncertain times, and you are valid for feeling wary and anxious. Take things at your own pace, but try not to block out everything and everyone. Look after yourselves!

Do you run a baby or toddler class in Birmingham? If so you could be in with a chance of winning a year’s FREE membership to Happity. Interested in the potential to win a Happity Membership? Read on!

How to enter

Happity is now in Birmingham. And until 30th September, if you are a Baby & Toddler class provider, you can get free set up when they register with us!

Not only that, if providers register by 12th September and comment on our Facebook competition post “done!” you will be in with a chance of winning a free upgrade to a Happity membership, therefore giving you access to all the benefits Happity has to offer!

All listings are free. However if you upgrade to Happity membership you get loads of added marketing benefits – including access to our venue finder, and a ready made mailing list through our Followers feature; as well as access to Promoted Listings and our Bookings system! As well as this, we offer our members unlimited enquiries with our team, giving you all the help you need and making sure you are being heard by actual people.

You can find out more about Happity here, and you can find out what we included in a Happity membership here!

Want a Happity membership now?

If you just can’t wait to upgrade (and at just £37.50 +VAT per year we do understand 😉 don’t worry however, if you win a Happity membership, we’ll reimburse you!

To register, head to our Birmingham launch page now, and then head to our FB competition post and comment “done!” below.

Terms and conditions

1.      The first prize is a year’s membership with Happity for free

2.      UK entrants over 18 only. UK delivery only. The prize will not be valid for addresses outside of the UK.

3.      Employees and agents of Happity and anyone professionally connected with the administration of the Competition are not permitted to enter.

4.      To enter the competition, you must register via the link provided above and comment “done” on the relevant Facebook Post. Therefore, there is a maximum of 1 entry per person.

5.      Competition opens when the post is live and closes at midnight on 12th September 2021.

6.      The winners will be randomly selected out of all valid entries.

7.      Competition winners will be notified directly on Facebook on 13th September 2021. You must provide accurate contact details on notification within 72 hours (through a private message). Failure to respond to this message means an alternative winner will be selected from all valid entries received.

8.      All entrants agree to their names and comments being used for promotional purposes. Copyright in all material submitted as entries rests with the promoter.

9.      We will not pass on your personal details to any other organisation without your permission, except for the purpose of awarding the prize.

10.  The Competition will be run, and the Prize will be awarded at Happity’s sole discretion. Our, Happity’s, decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into.

11.  We reserve the right to refuse entry into the Competition

12.  We reserve the right to change the Competition rules and these Terms and Conditions from time to time. If we do so, we will always have the most up to date terms and conditions on this page

13.  The Competition and these Terms and Conditions are governed by English Law. England & Wales shall have exclusive jurisdiction to settle any dispute or claim that arises out of or in connection with these Terms and Conditions.

14.  This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with Facebook. You are providing your information to Happity and not to any of these platforms. Therefore by participating in this promotion you agree to a complete release of Facebook from any claims. Participation in this promotion is subject to the official rules.

Lockdown has been a rough time for everyone, especially mothers, families, and those providing baby & toddler classes. However, during these trying times, Happity has stayed hopeful. We have remained passionate and driven in pushing for the importance of baby classes.

Our fully remote working team has gone from strength to strength as we’ve welcomed more and more members into the family. What started off as a small support team has now grown with new faces bringing renewed energy to help spread the Happity name.

But, despite having been running since 2017, only a few of us had actually met in person! That is until recently…

Where did Happity, and it’s passion for baby and toddler classes, begin?

Co-founders Emily and Sara set up the company as mothers themselves. Both understand the struggles that mothers go through with PND and the loneliness.

Both have had previous successful careers. Emily is a former employee at innocent smoothies and Sara is a former employee at BBC Radio One. But, the two of them were united (and we are so glad they were!) through their joint passions.

What was their mutual drive? To simultaneously help parents learn how to maintain their mental wellness while also providing an easy place to find baby classes. And, thus, Happity was born!

To read more about Emily and Sara’s stories, click here!

Who is in our team?

Happity has welcomed many more likeminded individuals with the same ambition to help mothers through these difficult times. With this they have welcomed many members!

Nicola, the social media star (and a mother of two fully grown daughters) with a creative minds that has no bounds. Lisa, a mother and a true people person with a whimsical delightful aura. Sophie, a mother and a master of advertisement. Andy, a father and a tech wizard capable of several technical feats.

And then we also have our great team of young kickstarters!

Alex, a mother and an Admin superstar who can dot the i’s and cross the t’s like no other. Leanne, Happity’s very own Bard, except instead of writing epic poems like Homer, she focuses on epic blogs. Jack, a marketing muse who brings his own creative flare to the marketing team.

Kayleigh; a zestful mind with a great passion for the work she does. And we recently gained a new member to our team: Adelayo! She will be Andy’s assistant in the challenging world of tech support. She has a great passion for coding and can’t wait to get stuck into the new tasks Happity has planned for her.

This has become known as the Happity family, and as you can tell, it will continue to grow exponentially in the coming years.

The Happity team- toothy and elated to be together in person for the first time!

Team training (in person!)

Only a few of us had actually met before. With coronavirus having still been a risk, we haven’t had the chance to, until now!

The opportunity to meet each other finally arrived on the 10th of August. Thanks to Lockdown restrictions being lifted we were able to celebrate Happity Day as a collective. We still remained vigilant however, each taking lateral flow tests beforehand to make sure we were preventing any potential spread.

The day started off with a team building exercise run by Sara. We looked at how we can better utilise our work time. This then led into a little quiz in which we were able to identify what type of workers we all were.

The results ranged from the prioritiser, to the planner and others such as the visualiser. This fun little quiz helped to give the team a better idea of how each of us works best and how we can better work together. (You can find out your own personality type here!)

Mental wellness with the baby and toddler classes crew

After putting our brains on full blast with the team building, we then took the opportunity to put them on ice as we went into a group yoga session to give us all an insight into the feeling of a clear mind and a method to relax. This involved a 10-minute meditation period, listening to guide talk us through the way we can engage our muscles and connect with our body while lying effortlessly on the floor.

After a glorious looking lunch, which Emily had generously provided for us along with a glass of prosecco each, it was Emily’s turn to run a training session.

Emily conducted a session that helped us evaluate our own self worth and what we all value in our lives. As a trained life coach, she helped us to better grasp our aims and how we can all individually better ourselves through our day to day lives.

This would help us to gauge the values that Happity as a company also holds dear; through its commitment to helping with the mental wellbeing of all its clients.

It’s not all fun and games working for Happity… Apart from when it is!

(From Left to Right) Lisa, Kayleigh and Emily from Happity (Baby and Toddler Classes site) stand as mini golf victors!

With the ‘work’, done it was time for the challenging part… Crazy golf!

All of us raced up to the golf course for a horse racing themed extravaganza. There were highs, there were laughs and there were miseries as we all realised that none of us were as good at golf as we had once thought.

At the end of the day Kayleigh was the official winner, yet all of us had a greater sense of victory.

We had come together on a lovely day to celebrate the work we had done and the company that we had grown to become accustomed to on what turned out to be a unforgettable Happity Day.

We had such a lovely day. And we’ve actually put a reel together showing you the best bits! Check it out here – and be sure to leave us a like and a comment!

Would you like to join our award winning baby and toddler classes team?

If our team sounds like a group that you would like to be a part of, then here’s some good news: you could be! We have some great opportunities within Happity ready and waiting to be filled.

If you are aged 16-24, and are on Universal Credit, then check out our opportunities here. If you’re 24 or over, check out our opportunities here!

Hopefully this will be the first of many Happity days for us to share!

What does a mum with PND look like? It might not be the one you expect. She might be the mum you meet at a toddler group who looked like she’s got it all together. Or the mum you passed on the street who smiled and looked so happy.

The truth is you might never know how another mum is REALLY feeling. So be kind! Always.

1. The mother with the biggest smile in the room

When you think of someone who has depression you expect them to look sad or down. But a mum with PND might have the brightest smile in the room. Why? Because she might be putting on a mask. And making a really big effort to hide her true feelings.

2. The one who looks like they’ve got it all together

A mum with PND might look like someone who has got the hang of this parenting gig and appears to do it with ease. She might post photos to social media where she and her baby look so happy and content. You might even see those pics and feel a little envious of how easily she seems to have slotted into her new role as a mama.

Remember that social media never tells the whole story. The mum you think is bossing it might really be struggling behind closed doors. She might also be doing both!

busting the myths of postnatal depression

3. The one who is chatty and engaged when you meet them

You might expect a mum with PND is withdrawn and disengaged. But she might be friendly and chatty when you meet her. The truth is it might have taken a lot of strength and energy for her to get out and be with others. And she might be putting in her all to chat and engage to find support but to also hide her PND – especially with those she’s just met.

4. The one who looks amazing

You met a mum who looked amazing. Dressed immaculately, her smile enhanced by a slick of lippy. Hair looking fab. You cannot always tell who has depression by her outward appearance. She might have put her best look on to raise her confidence before leaving the house.

6. The mum who is surrounded by family and friends

You might know or meet a mum who has family nearby who are super supportive and who has loads of amazing friends. And think that they must be so happy and well.

It can certainly help, but even being surrounded by an army of caring people that love you is sometimes no shield for PND.

Those suffering might be surrounded by a load of people who care but still feel isolated and alone.

7. The mother you LEAST expect to have PND

The truth is that you might not know who is struggling with their mental health. Unless they tell you.

Sometimes those suffering choose not to tell many people about their struggles.

PND – behind the mask

There is still too much stigma and too many myths surrounding PND. Many mums might feel a misplaced feeling of shame or a fear of judgement if they admit they are suffering.

They might feel alone and lonely.

They might not know how to ask for help. Or just not have the energy to reach out.

Support for PND

Sometimes the hardest and bravest step when you have PND is asking for help. When you take that step you are one step closer to recovery. And PND is 100% recoverable.

Find out where to get help and support

We always recommend Pandas as a wonderful place to get support. And APNI.

We also have some amazing classes listed on Happity that support mums with PND. Head to Happity to find classes near you.

You’re busy looking after your baby. You’re coping with sleep deprivation. You just don’t have time to think about how to lose any weight you put on in pregnancy. You should always love your body – it just grew a tiny human after all! But what are some easy bite-size weight loss tips for busy mums? It’s all about learning to walk before you can run!

The dreaded D word bringing out the toddler in you!

When it comes to trying to lose weight and the dreaded ‘D’ word, does your brain have a particular reaction that can be frustrating, torrential, aggravating and usually end up with you sitting on the naughty step with a tub of ice cream in your lap as you have a little bit of a cry?

First of all, let us reassure you, you are not alone! Most of us have heard the word ‘diet’ so many times that it immediately sends us into a fight or flight frenzy! We are all in the same boat when it comes to that ‘D’ word.

But, sadly, here comes the bad news: quick-fix diets rarely work!

A bit of a difficult pill to swallow for a lot of people. But speaking for the sake of mums here: we don’t have time to think about how to lose weight. We are tired, and so the mere sight of a salad makes us want an extra bit of cake. Our reactions mimic our toddlers, and suddenly not wanting to share is kind of understandable.

So, should we just give up because we are busy? Definitely not. If you’re feeling a bit down about your new mum tum then here are some easy ways to approach it all.

Weight loss tip for busy mums: “Learning to walk”

When a baby is taking its first magical steps, it doesn’t happen automatically. Our baba’s don’t suddenly kick their heels together in the air and start galloping through the wind, doing star jumps and flips.

First, they learn the basics. They learn how to sit up, they learn how to stand, and they learn how to balance. Then, and only then, have they got some base work and can learn to walk.

The same logic can be applied to when we want to try and get healthy. It’s near impossible to jump straight into the lifestyle of the fit and healthy. We shouldn’t hold such high expectations of ourselves of being able to do it all straight away! If we want to be able to run, we first need to learn to walk

And if we want to learn to walk, we need to focus on the base work.

Step one: sitting up (yup, we’re still talking weight loss tips)

This is the first big step and the beginning of your journey. For a lot of us, this is the most difficult. Mainly because we have decided we want to do something to change our lifestyle. It’s okay to feel nervous! But, we should not inflate this step into being our end goal. We all have a finish line to reach, and it’s not going to be at the starting pole.

Our first hurdle is this: do just one thing that will begin to improve your mental or physical health.

Not something as vague as “start a diet” however. This one thing should be specific. Think of what you are going to do in more detail.

A couple of weight loss tips/ideas that we had for mums:

  • Do one activity a week that involves physical exercise. That might be as simple as walking your little one to the park when you would normally drive. Or signing up for a baby/toddler class that involves more physical activity. We have plenty of classes listed (Latino Bambino, Sweaty Mama, Buggyfit to list just a few) on Happity that might help with this.
  • Learn more about Nutrition: This step may not involve making any changes to your eating habits yet. This step is more just about finding out what nutrition is. And how eating well can make you feel better. One of the easiest ways you can slide these little tidbits into your day is by following a few nutrition/body positivity pages on social media! Some influencers on Instagram include NicsNutrition or Rhirition for nutrition information, and Alexlight_ldn for body positivity. Have a look around to see who appeals to you!
Faceless figure sitting at a table and researching - weight loss tips for mums

A change is a change, no matter how small or simple it might sound at first. Once doing one of these feels second nature to you, and is firmly in your routine, then move to the next step.

Step two: standing up

The next step isn’t too tricky to wrap your head around: add one more thing to your routine that will help your mental or physical health.

A few more weight loss tips for mums!:

  • Eating at regular meal times: This one can often be the downfall for a lot of mamas. But, why not try eating at the same time that your child is eating. Or just before/after if it’s impossible to eat and feed! Try not to forget about yourself when you are feeding others. And if eating all of your meals regularly still sounds too hard, then try at least getting your breakfast at a regular time every morning.
  • Getting enough sleep: Studies have shown that getting good quality sleep is equally as important as diet and exercise in regulating our weight. Again, this is a tricky one for mums. But, there’s a few things you can try doing to squeeze in a few extra hours of sleep. Napping at the same time your child for example. Or going to bed an hour earlier than normal. It can be tempting to want to stay awake for as much as your “alone time” as possible. But if you catch your extra Z’s, you’ll feel a lot of mental benefits too like an improved mood and reduced levels of stress.

It’s a good thing to note that if you try one of these weight loss tips for mums, and you just can’t do it right now or it’s not working, then change it! Give something else a go and dip your toe in the different waters.

Managed to squeeze one of these into your routine too? Great! Onto the next step.

Step three: finding your balance

You’re getting the idea. Add another thing to your routine that will help your mental or physical health. You’ve done it twice already now, you can do it a third!

More weight loss tips for mums? Don’t mind if we do!:

  • Meal prepping: Time to raid the tupperware cupboard! Meal prepping is a great way to have your breakfast, lunch and/or dinners ready to go within a moments notice. Give yourself a regular day where you know you’ll have a bit of free time (and when you’re not mentally exhausted!) to prep up some healthy and ready to go meals. There’s a few good ideas over on Tasty, but there’s also plenty of videos on YouTube to give you some ideas too!
  • Resist eating up your kid’s leftovers: One of our pitfalls! our child leaves behind food on their plate and we are tired and hungry and pooch it off. Make it your mantra to avoid eating what they leave on their plates!
  • Reduce cakes, biscuits and sweets: This one is the bane of us all! An important thing to note: you should not tell yourself that you are cutting it out altogether! If you really and dearly want that slice of cake, then you deserve it! Go for it, and don’t tell yourself “no”. All you should consider doing is reducing the amount of that thing you are having gradually. No sudden changes, no quick decisions. Take your time with it. Because life is too short to not have that tesco jam doughnut every once in a while!
A mother and daughter -weight loss tips for mums

How are you doing? Mastered this one? Okay, next step!

Step four: Walking

So, this is what it’s been leading up to. This is what the base work has been for. This is where we get on the road and figure out how to lose weight.

And, here’s a surprise, you’re already doing it. You’ve walked three steps already, and you’ve done them at your own pace.

By this point, you will have taught yourself the ways in which you personally find your body is able to change. You can find the ideal ways to convince your body to do little changes without cutting out anything that you don’t want to.

Understandably, this is a long haul approach, and the weight will not fly off. But remember, this weight didn’t arrive overnight, it won’t leave overnight either.

Keep on keeping on with new weight loss tips

From here, it’s as simple as carrying on! Keep on introducing new things into your lifestyle that will help you and your health. Gradually, you’ll be a completely different person to the one you once were. But, patience is key! Do not try to rush your health.

The NHS have listed a few more ways you can improve your healthy eating here (if you are looking for more ideas).

Oh, and we have just one more extra point to say to those who want to lose weight.

Remember: try to love your body

This world is made up of so many different people, and the wobbly bits that make us different make us wonderful! The world can offer all sorts of tips on how to get healthier. But, that’s exactly it. You should think about wanting to be healthy, mentally and physically. Being healthy doesn’t necessarily mean researching how to lose weight. Being healthier may mean for you to figure out how to love yourself.

So we want to say this: big shout out to the mum bods, the mum tums and your wobbly bits.

If you are reading this as a new mum, remember that it took nine months for your body to grow and change so it makes sense that it will take at least nine months to change back. The human body is miraculous. You did just grow a tiny human in there, remember? Do not punish or hate your body for achieving that amazing feat! Give it the extra love it needs.

And If you are reading this as a dad, well you have been carrying the stresses and the weight of supporting your partners through all this too! Do not feel bad for gaining a little weight in the process. This weight was gained through love and care for your family. Give it a little bit of love too!

Child like finger painting relating to weight loss tips for mums

Disclaimer: We are not health or medical professionals and you should always seek medical advice if you are worried about your health. If you are severely concerned about your own or a loved one’s weight/health, then you should contact your GP to seek out help.